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Addressing Childhood Obesity
Addressing Childhood Obesity

Stakeholders release report on barriers to evidence-based care for childhood obesity.

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Luxury Rehab Facility Opens in Cahaba
Luxury Rehab Facility Opens in Cahaba

"We don't consider those who come here for rehabilitation as residents or patients, they're guests and we call them guests," says Landie Acker-Langley, admissions coordinator at the Aspire Physical Recovery Center at Cahaba River, a new short-term rehabilitation facility in Vestavia Hills.

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Stroke Risk Prevention Should Continue Through Senior Years
Stroke Risk Prevention Should Continue Through Senior Years

Anyone can have a stroke--thousands of people in the U.S. die or suffer a disabling brain injury from stroke every year. The odds of whether you will be one of them increase dramatically if you have hypertension, diabetes or smoke.

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Preventing Hospital-Induced Delirium
Preventing Hospital-Induced Delirium

Have you ever dreamed of walking in a fog, unsure of where you are and what those strange sights and sounds at the edge of your awareness might be? It's frightening. It's also similar to what some patients--especially those who are elderly or very ill--may experience when they are hospitalized.

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Children's Dr. Robert Russell Creates Appendicitis Algorithm
Children's Dr. Robert Russell Creates Appendicitis Algorithm

When a parent brings a child into the ER with a fever and stomachache, one possible diagnosis is appendicitis. Given the possible need for emergency surgery, it is important to quickly get an accurate diagnosis.

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Reinventing Med Ed by Adding a Third Pillar
Reinventing Med Ed by Adding a Third Pillar

Last month, leadership of the American Medical Association, in conjunction with representatives from medical schools in Pennsylvania and Rhode Island, unveiled the latest innovation in the quest to improve physician training to meet the demands of practicing medicine in the 21st century.

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New Bio-inductive Implants Improve Rotator Cuff Surgery Outcomes
New Bio-inductive Implants Improve Rotator Cuff Surgery Outcomes

Rotator cuff surgery, once a subspecialty with a low public profile, has become the subject of frequent headlines for sports fans. And a new generation of technology is improving surgical outcomes as well as the recovery process. The increased visibility of rotator cuff surgery results from several factors according to Kenneth Bramlett, MD of the Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Clinic of Alabama.

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Suicide Watch
Suicide Watch

With the belief that suicide deaths for individuals under the care of a provider should be preventable, behavioral health specialists have set a goal that is both audacious and aspirational.

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Pack Health Offers Tools to Help Lower Readmission Rates
Pack Health Offers Tools to Help Lower Readmission Rates

There's one provision of the Affordable Care Act that hasn't gotten much attention outside the industry, but it's a significant one: providers face financial penalties when a patient is readmitted more than 30 days after treatment.

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Improving Access to Clinical Trials
Improving Access to Clinical Trials

With the launch of trials.cancer.gov, the National Cancer Institute hopes that making clinical trial information more user-friendly will result in greater awareness and participation in clinical trials to move the science forward faster.

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Symptoms and Treatment of Venous Disease
Symptoms and Treatment of Venous Disease

Many of us experience leg discomfort, especially at the end of the day. However, there are a number of symptoms that can point to the possibility that someone has chronic venous insufficiency: heaviness, aching, swelling throbbing, itching, and/or cramping in your legs.

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Starve a Cancer, Feed a Patient
Starve a Cancer, Feed a Patient

A professor in the UAB School of Health Professions and Vice-Chair for Research in the Department of Nutrition Sciences, Barbara Gower, PhD, serves as director of the metabolism core for the Nutrition Obesity Research Center and is a senior scientist at the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center.

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Starve a Cancer, Feed a Patient
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Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy

Using the Body's Own Defenses to Fight Cancer

This summer the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference in Chicago named immunotherapy its Advance of the Year for 2016. This approach to treatment is being called possibly an even greater breakthrough than chemotherapy.

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HIFU Offers Hope for Some Prostate Cancer Patients
HIFU Offers Hope for Some Prostate Cancer Patients

One in seven men in the United States will face prostate cancer at some time in their lives, making the disease the second leading cause of cancer death in America. For some of these patients, a new minimally invasive procedure can help them avoid surgery and the side effects that may follow.

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Smith Performs Zero Fluoroscopy Ablation
Smith Performs Zero Fluoroscopy Ablation

There's something missing in Dr. Macy Smith's cardiac operating room these days: the use of a bulky fluoroscope, and the collection of leaded aprons needed to protect doctors, staff, and patients from the machine's continuous X-rays.

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UAB Testing Robotic Platform for Prostate Cancer Detection and Treatment
UAB Testing Robotic Platform for Prostate Cancer Detection and Treatment

During a man's lifetime, odds are one in seven that he be diagnosed with prostate cancer. If it's a slower growing form detected in later years, he may live out a normal life span and die with it, but not from it.

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New Procedure Shows Promise for Treatment of Enlarged Prostate
New Procedure Shows Promise for Treatment of Enlarged Prostate

More than half of men 50 years of age and older, and up to 90 percent of men over 80 are affected by symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia BPH, or enlarged prostate, which can significantly impact quality of life.

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Sequencing the DNA Profile of Patients with Specific Diseases
Sequencing the DNA Profile of Patients with Specific Diseases

For most physicians, difficult conversations come with the territory.

After the initial shock of hearing a serious diagnosis and absorbing what the prognosis could mean, the next question patients often ask is why. Why me? Why now?

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Expanding ADNI: Alzheimer's Biomarker Study Embarks on Next Phase
Expanding ADNI: Alzheimer's Biomarker Study Embarks on Next Phase

The landmark Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) began in October 2004 with a goal of finding more sensitive and accurate methods to detect Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the early stages and to track progression by identifying and monitoring biomarkers. Last month, the NIH's National Institute on Aging announced an award of approximately $40 million over the next five years to launch ADNI3.

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New Therapy Turns Back Time for Menopausal Women
New Therapy Turns Back Time for Menopausal Women

Almost half of women in the United States suffer from symptoms of declining estrogen, including the uncomfortable condition of vaginal atrophy. The atrophy causes thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls which leads to painful intercourse and problems with urination.

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Sequencing Cancer: HudsonAlpha Joins ORIEN Avatar Collaboration
Sequencing Cancer: HudsonAlpha Joins ORIEN Avatar Collaboration

For patients with advanced stage cancer, time is life.

HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology has joined 13 of the nation's top cancer research centers in the Oncology Research Information Exchange Network® (ORIEN), a collaboration to accelerate clinical development and discovery of treatments for advanced-stage cancers.

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From Genome to Bedside How Far Have We Come?
From Genome to Bedside How Far Have We Come?

A wave of excitement swept through medical science in 2003 when the first sequencing of the human genome was completed. News stories were full of enthusiastic predictions of a revolution in health care.

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UAB Patients Receive New Dissolving Heart Stent
UAB Patients Receive New Dissolving Heart Stent

Cardiologists at UAB Hospital are the first in Alabama to treat coronary artery disease patients with a new dissolving heart stent. The Abbott's Absorb bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS), FDA approved for use in July, gradually dissolves and may be a safer option for patients in the future.

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Displaying Articles 26 - 49 of 49
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